Haskell Edwards is a wreck. When he met rising young star Cello Shea, he was one of the most respected directors in Hollywood. Their romance was the stuff of legend; together they were unstoppable. The serendipity was shattered on the night of her suicide.

Nine years later, Haskell bobs along in an inebriated, self-inflicted haze, surviving by directing a B-grade vampire series when his agent calls with an offer. Lifeform, a cutting edge biotech firm diversifying into film wants to make a biopic about Cello’s life, and they want Haskell to direct.

Angry and insulted, he takes the meeting. He finds, instead, that they want to create an honest portrait of the girl Haskell loved. But upon meeting Richard Ballantyne, the shallow young Hollywood megastar hired to play Haskell in the film, he realizes casting Cello is an impossible task.

Until she walks in.

“She” is a LifeDoll – an incredibly life-life robot, one designed to mimic Cello perfectly.

Horrified and fascinated at the same time, Haskell takes the job. Sobering up as he sets to work re-writing the script, pre-production begins. Adrianna, his ex-wife, will teach the Doll to be Cello. His current girlfriend, Lauren, fades out of his life, eventually realizing she’s been replaced by the ghost of a dead woman with whom she can never compete.

As production begins, we see his life with Cello unfold alongside the movie, the real story blending with the Hollywood fiction as they blur in Haskell’s mind. Watching the best moments of his life re-enacted in front of him, watching the Doll, Haskell becomes convinced she is more real than her designers know. Ultimately, he’s forced to address the differences between his love for Cello the person, and his growing obsession with a machine that is nothing more than a programmed doppelganger.

Or is it?